Julie J. Sprengel

Julie J. Sprengel has been appointed president of CommonSpirit Health’s newly expanded Southern California Division.

Julie J. Sprengel has been appointed president of CommonSpirit Health’s newly expanded Southern California Division.

In this role, she will continue to oversee Dignity Health hospitals in San Bernardino County, Los Angeles County, and Clark County, Nevada.

Joining the newly formed division will be the Dignity Health hospitals from Central Coast and Central California -- a total of 21 facilities. This new division will be the largest in CommonSpirit Health, with $6B in revenue.

Sprengel began her career more than 20 years ago as an emergency room nurse and has spent the majority of her career working in faith-based, nonprofit health care systems.

She honed her clinical and administrative expertise through a series of leadership positions with increasing responsibility,

culminating in her position as a hospital chief executive officer.

In 2016, she was recruited as the senior vice president of operations for Dignity Health Southern California, and in 2019 was named president of the Southwest Division for CommonSpirit Health. 

“Julie has shown exceptional leadership throughout her career at Dignity Health -- especially during the COVID-19 pandemic as she oversees hospital operations in some of the hardest hit areas of the country,” said Marvin O’Quinn, president and chief operating officer of CommonSpirit Health, parent company of Dignity Health. “In this expanded role, Julie will be well-positioned to help broaden our continuum of care services, focus on integrating and coordinating our primary care models and improving access to care for patients in underserved communities.”

During the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, Sprengel played a pivotal role in opening the Los Angeles Surge Hospital (LASH), a first of its kind public-private partnership between the State of California, Los Angeles County, Dignity Health and Kaiser Permanente. In addition to working on the executive team to open the hospital, she also served as its CEO for the duration of its operations. The temporary facility provided complex ICU services to some of the most vulnerable patients affected by COVID-19.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.