Census

The U.S. Census Bureau is urging all residents to “shape their future” by participating in the Census.

With about 4 in 10 households having yet to respond to the 2020 Census, the U.S. Census Bureau announced it is on track to conduct multiple follow-up activities aimed at ensuring a complete and accurate count.

So far, Fontana’s response rate is higher than the state average.

Census Bureau staff will conduct the following operations in the upcoming months:

----- COVERAGE IMPROVEMENT

The Census Bureau began making followup calls to some households that have already completed the 2020 Census. The goal is to make sure everyone in a household was counted, and to validate information provided when they completed the census questionnaire. Census call center agents began making calls on April 22. If the household does not answer a call, agents will leave a voicemail with a 12-digit ID as a reference number. This effort is set to continue through the end of the response phase on Oct. 31.

----- NONRESPONSE FOLLOWUP

The Census Bureau routinely “soft launches” operations to ensure systems, operations and field plans work as they should. Starting in mid-July, census takers from six area census offices (one per Census Bureau region) will begin the operation of interviewing households that have yet to respond to the 2020 Census. The six area census offices will be announced by the beginning of this month. Additional area census offices may be announced for a second wave soft launch to occur later in July.

Aside from area census offices that are part of a soft launch, the remaining area census offices will begin the Nonresponse Followup on Aug. 11 and conclude no later than Oct. 31.

All census takers will be trained on social distancing protocols. They will be issued personal protective equipment (PPE) and follow local guidelines for their use.

----- NONRESPONSE FOLLOWUP REINTERVIEW

In some cases, a second census taker may visit a household to conduct a short interview to ensure the quality of the bureau's data collection activities. These reinterviews are meant to confirm every census taker followed the proper training and did their jobs correctly. The reinterview will be conducted by a different census taker than the one who originally visited the household. The Nonresponse Followup Reinterview operation is scheduled to run from Aug. 12 to Oct. 31.

----- POST ENUMERATION SURVEY

After a household has already completed the 2020 Census, census takers will visit a select number of households as part of the Post-Enumeration Survey. The Census Bureau conducts this survey to measure the coverage of housing units and people residing in housing units in the 2020 Census. To that end, census takers will gather the following information:

• Current residents of the housing unit.

• People living in the household who may or may not have been there April 1 (Census Day).

• People who moved out of the household between April 1 and the time of the interview.

• The information collected for each person includes name, sex, age, date of birth, race, relationship to householder, and Hispanic origin. The interviewer also collects information about alternate addresses to establish where people lived on Census Day, according to census residence rules.

The Census Bureau urges the small percentage of households that are contacted during the Nonresponse Followup Reinterview and Post-Enumeration Survey operations to take a few minutes with the census taker to help ensure the quality of the Census.

All census takers have official ID badges that include their name, photograph, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date.

The Census Bureau said it conducts all operations with two key principles in mind: (1) protecting the health and safety of its staff and the public, and (2) fulfilling its statutory requirement to deliver the 2020 Census counts to the president on schedule.

The U.S. Constitution mandates a census of the population every 10 years. Census statistics help determine the number of seats each state holds in the U.S. House of Representatives and how billions of dollars in federal funds will be allocated to states and communities for the next 10 years.

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